Small Scaled Livestock Farming! Glimpses from Indian Gujrat


Small  Scaled Livestock Farming and pastoralism are synonymous in many parts of the world. This beautiful system produces unique quality of food items in a very ecofriendly way. The system is sustainable, having no negative effects on the mother earth’s health.

13307263_10209113242485726_6762415476746384806_n.jpg

This system is community centered, rich with traditional knowledge, a full family business and based on very low inputs.13310593_10209113242725732_55280275851466963_n.jpg

camel play very pivotal role in this system.13335785_10209113243045740_2276470669661594807_n.jpgAmong them women play significant role..to manage heard as well the family.

The great milk robbery and Small Scaled Farmers


Small-scale farmers, pastoralists and vendors are doing an amazing job of supplying the growing markets for dairy in the South. The problem is that corporate interests are after these same markets and they are using heavy tactics to steal them from the poor, while governments are lending a helping hand.buffalo small.jpg

Financial investors and big dairy corporations are joining forces to set up mega dairy farms throughout the South. Cargill’s hedge fund is committing $300 million to factory dairy farms in China and India. The world’s biggest dairy cooperative, Fonterra, is building farms in China, India, and Brazil on a scale that it could never get away with in its home country New Zealand. A bank in Vietnam is building a 137,000 cow farm. These are social and ecological disasters that will bring hardship to millions of people.small scaled dairy.jpg

Look, How corporations are stealing livelihoods and a vital source of nutrition from the poor, is available here

https://www.grain.org/article/entries/4259-the-great-milk-robbery-how-corporations-are-stealing-livelihoods-and-a-vital-source-of-nutrition-from-the-poor

20151011_161444

 

Gender Equality, Resilience to Climate change, and Desisgning Livestock Project for Rural Development


The role of native livestock breeds and women in agricultural development is pivotal. Here, I present few lines from abstract of an article written by Nicola J.C. Chanamuto and Stephen J.G. Hall. The author had written very comprehensive manuscript to highlight the role of women in rural development while using native livestock breeds as a tool.20151011_161325

“Currently, there is growing interest in how livestock projects can contribute to resilience to the effects of climate change. In this article we recommend a shift away from gross productivity to sustainability, via the use of thrifty local breeds, with an additional emphasis on improving survival of young animals. These animals, due to their local adaptations, are more likely to be resilient to climate change. There is a gender dimension to these proposals, since smaller animals and local breeds are more likely to be perceived by communities as suitable for husbandry by women. We recommend a re-orientation towards an explicit gender-equality focus for these projects.

Details of the articles can be study through the following link;

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13552074.2015.1096041