Study Found Camel Milk Helps in Halting Diabetes


Camel milk has been shown, to be effective in reducing the level of glycosylated or glycated haemoglobin in the blood. This is haemoglobin to which glucose is attached, and is typically found at high levels in people with diabetes. Camel milk can therefore be used to reduce the dose of insulin that diabetes patients require. “This is because camel milk has been shown to contain an insulin-like molecule,” said Dr Dubey. “Diabetes is a disease in which the therapeutic potential of camel milk can be maximally utilized. It has well-observed clinical benefits.” It is no wonder then that, as the authors of the review note, epidemiological surveys indicate that there is a low prevalence of diabetes in communities where camel milk is consumed.camel milk

The report of the study published in the National News paper;

http://www.thenational.ae/uae/science/how-camel-milk-could-be-better-for-you-than-anyone-imagined#page1

Before the release of this study, author reported that camel milk is good for diabetes patients. The link of that report is given in the link below.Camelait is Al Ain dairy product. It is pasteurized camel milk.

https://camel4milk.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/camel-a-one-in-all-creature/

https://camel4milk.wordpress.com/2014/11/15/the-exploring-world-of-camel-milk/

Camel milk, too, contains large quantities of antibodies that, similarly, can help to protect against infection. Enzymes it contains, such as lysozyme and lactoperoxidase, are likely to help combat bacterial infections. The authors of the review, who also include Manohar Lal and Anyaa Mittal, from the BITS Pilani Rajasthan campus, and Suman Kapur, from the BITS Pilani Andhra Pradesh campus, suggest that camel milk could contain a substance with the complex-sounding name of camel alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells, or CAMLET.DSC00315

“It would be in the best interest of patients if any anti-cancer molecule could be isolated or derived from camel milk,” said Dr Dubey. So, as modern science discovers more about the therapeutic benefits of camel milk, specific components could be used in a more targeted ways to combat illness. It is an outcome that, were they to have known, would probably have pleased those who began drinking this precious liquid all those thousands of years ago.

This report was prepared by Daniel Bardsley; he is a UK-based freelance journalist and former reporter at The National.

 

International Camel Society Showed Serous Concerns on Important Camel Decline


The International Society of Camelid Research and Development is a non-political, non-religious and nonprofit federation of camelid scientists or similar scientific and professional associations. The society works for the scientific status of camelid sciences, promotion of camel science for camelids development, promotion of scientific publications in camelid fields, to set high standards in camelid education and training, promote standards of health and welfare in camelids, encourage exchange of knowledge and to organize international conference every 3 years.

http://www.isocard.net/en/about

IMG-1ffc708cbc78410The last conference was held in Almaty, Kazakhstan (8-12 June, 2015). The 225 participants of the conference, have proposed the final recommendations which have been validated by the Executive Council. All the participants’ anonymously expressed their serous concerns on the sharp decline in camel population of India.

http://www.isocard.net/images/announcements//FILEc554c4cf9e3290a.pdf

As a foreword, the general assembly of ISOCARD has expressed its concern regarding the important decline of the camel population in India, which is a reverse of the trend evident in the world camel population. The General Assembly of ISOCARD has encouraged any scientific studies aiming to assess the impact of this decline on the camel breeders’ livelihood and on the local and rural economy.

IMG-ae58c842e3ffd4e

I (Dr Abdul Raziq Kakar) hereby appeal Indian Camel Scientists, development workers, NGOs and public interest departments to come forward and find ways forward to halt this decline and support the camel keepers, for whom camel is the backbone of their economy.

The like minded camel development workers, scientists and breeders are fabricating (in process) a society (Camels4Life) to address hot issues of camels, its decline and advocacy for the role of camel in rural and agricultural development. Being the responsible person of the Camels4Life, I hereby offer my support on behalf of our society and colleagues to find ways for using camel a sustainable mobile ATM for the camel pastoralists all over the world, especially in the South western Indian~The beautiful Rajasthan.

http://www.thenational.ae/uae/health/al-ain-doctor-sees-potential-in-camels-beyond-their-milk

raziq

Camels’ Milk Miracle for Autistic Patients~A letter from Ram Prasad (India)


Dear Razir Sir,
Thanks a lot for your kind hearted help, which made me, what seems to be an impossible to achieve considering the place where am living. Getting a camel milk to the Southern part of India, Chennai from scorching Rajasthan, is a mighty task. Thanks, Raziq sir, for providing me all possible inputs and continuous guidance. Am thanking Christina Adams who is the one first I contacted and, Hanwant singh Rathore and Ilse too for helping me supplying the camel milk, in a neatly packed way, so that milk does not get decompose. There are many significant changes in my kid after he starts taking camel milk. Currently, he is taking pasteurized milk of 700 ml+ daily and following are the improvements which we achieved.

1) His unnecessary irritation has gone.
2) His patience to wait for anything has increased considerably.
3) His eye contact improved.
4) His sleeping pattern has been streamlined and now he is having sound sleep daily.
5) His liver inflammatory has gone, resulting in good sleep, gained weight.
6) Now he is understanding small and simple commands.

raziq
Dr Raziq taking camel milk from the Cholistani herd in Bahawalpur

In between, we went to Punjab, India and got chance to get raw camel milk for a period of month time and that made a big difference in his eye contact. Am spreading awareness about benefits of camel milk across the autistic parents here and giving them the milk from my stock. am helping my colleague’s relation, who is having Alzheimer to take camel milk daily, which is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. Now he is doing really well and he uses to walk with others help, but now he can able to walk on his own. Next time, we are planning to get Raw milk henceforth and to feed everyone, who is having the problem, for which camel milk is the solution 🙂 . Am started just with a dot, people like Christina Adams, Abul Raziq Kakar, Hanwant singh Rathore, Ilse, made it as an excellent art altogether. Someway, there should be a relation between us all in some form, which is binding us now and happy to have such contacts, which is contributing something to the needy ones.

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A Healthy and Beautiful Udder of Brela Camel of Cholistan Desert 
Thanks & Regards,
RamPrasath.S.
“Time is a good doctor, but not a good beautician”

 

For further reading please look at the following links.

The future of Mongolian nomadic lifestyle under debate! Same situation of other nomadic societies in the world


The report is self explainatory. The situation of other Nomadic societis is almost the same.

Listen and download: Dr Caroline Upton talks on the issues facing Mongolian nomadic herdershttp://soundcloud.com/university-of-leicester/the-future-of-mongolian/s-aYEoy

 Geographers from the University of Leicester are involved in research on pastoralism, environment and livelihoods at a critical juncture in decision making over the future of Mongolia’s rural areas.Image

 The two year study, Community, Place and Pastoralism: Nature and Society in Post-Soviet Central Asia, funded by the Leverhulme Trust and involving work in both Mongolia and Kazakhstan, led to a meeting in Ulaanbaatar in September 2012, organised by the University of Leicester team and their Mongolian colleagues. At this meeting herders were able to discuss key land and livelihood issues directly with ministers, donors and government advisors.

 Dr Upton, the Principal Investigator for the project, said: “Mongolian herders are facing multiple pressures on their livelihoods, traditionally based on nomadic pastoralism, from climate change, mining, desertification and new policies on land. Through our project, national decision makers were brought together with affected parties and local stakeholders to debate some of the vital issues pertaining to nomadic culture, livelihoods and identity in modern Mongolia. They were also able to draw lessons from the Kazakh context, based on our project results.”

 Dr Moore, the project Research Associate, who spent 5 months conducting fieldwork in Mongolia, said: “The herders that I met were deeply aware of climatic and environmental change in their pastures that are affecting their lifestyle. They often have to move further and more often to find good grazing for their goats, sheep, horses and camels. Therefore many are concerned that any moves towards privatisation of pasture will reduce their ability to maintain their livelihoods and nomadic culture.”

 In recent years, Mongolian herders have been encouraged through government policy and donor interventions to form herder groups. These groups are designed to collaborate in pasture management, labour sharing and environmental conservation, as well as marketing of their livestock products, thus improving local livelihoods and resilience.

 A long-debated draft pastureland law, to be considered by the new Mongolian government in the next session of parliament, seeks to strengthen rights to key seasonal pastures for families and herders groups. Although this law focuses on possession rather than ownership rights, for some herders it has raised fears over the ultimate privatisation of pastureland and reduction in the ability to move, particularly in times of need.

 Government policy is also promoting intensification of livestock production. Thus, there are tensions between mobile and more sedentary livestock production in rural areas and questions are raised over the place of nomadic culture and identity in modern Mongolia.

 Dr Upton said: “This is a critical moment in decision making about the future of Mongolia’s rural areas. Enhanced rights of herders’ groups to key seasonal pastures have the potential to make positive contributions to local livelihoods and to conservation. Increases in mining activity also make the recognition of land rights especially important, so that herders’ voices may be heard in defending and seeking compensation for land loss and displacement.

 “However, centuries old traditions of mobility, flexibility and reciprocity should not be lost. As other pastoral cultures have found, ‘modernity’ does not necessarily equate with sedentarisation or privatisation. Nomadic heritages and practices retain great value”.

 The Leverhulme team are finalising detailed reports and articles to share with herders, international donors, and government policy makers, as part of their contribution to these vital, ongoing debates. Results of the work have also been presented at this years’ Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) annual conference in Edinburgh.

 

Art of Camel Hair Shearing~The Camels’ Attraction


The region of the Indo-Pak is rich with camel culture. Camel is an integral part of the heritage of the camel keepers’ communities in the region. As a source of livelihood, a camel is also a tool of recreation and entertainment also. This picture is about the haircut competition of great Thar desert. One can see the artistic theme of the designer/hair cutter.

The barbers make different designs according to the desire of the camel keepers/owners. Such designs are made by art loving, son of the soil, and very specialized barbers. The barbers are well known and have very busy days in the season. The season of the design is usually the cooler months of the year as the camel sheds his wool in the hotter months of the year. The complete design of a camel takes 2 to 5 hours, based on the size of the camel and the design of the art.

Barber making design on the camel body in Rajasthan.jpg

I would also like to add some more pictures of the camels with the hair designs and arts for the page from different sources.

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The barber has mad a design of the carpet on camel body

There are specific dates of the hair design festivals. In Rajasthan, the festival takes place every year in the month of January or late December and draws in camel breeders from all over Rajasthan, as well as tourists from all around the world.

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The Beautiful Flowers are designed

In Pakistan, especially Sindh and Punjab (The Great Thar desert and adjoining parts), the designs are made on the camels some days before Eid-ul-Azha (the Muslim Feast of Sacrifice) are his busiest. The charges between two and three thousand rupees (about $15) for one camel. The barber below the name is Ali. Ali can do over 14 different designs based on the size and color of the camel. He does all this work with one simple pair of scissors. Please watch the video at the link below.

Pakistani Barber Creates Art On Camels

Unfortunately, this beautiful camel heritage is sinking, especially in Rajasthan. The faulty policies are materializing the sinking of the precious camel heritage. A Beautiful Camel Heritage is Sinking.

Reference

Camel Shearing at Bikaner Camel Festival

When You Realize What This Man Is Doing To This Camel, Your Jaw Will Hit The Floor.