Beuragh Sheep Breed

Wolrd Soil Day – Grazing role in soil fertility

Each year soil day is celebrated globally to aware the masses about the importance of soil health. As I have been writing on healthy ecosystems, grazing, and biodiversity under the climate change scenario, I’m going to share a few of my relevant articles which are very helpful to understand the importance of soil and soil health and the role of livestock in maintaining soil fertility.

A scientific study revealed that grazing revitalizes our soil and sequestrates carbon up to 80%

A pre-designed scientific project with a plantation of native flora in the soil and allowing sheep grazing in Temple university (USA) proved that the grazed area could sequestrate up to 80% carbon – THE STUDY FOUND.

Click on the link to read in detail. My hypothesis of livestock grazing proved with a scientific research

World soil day 5 December
World soil day 5 December

Giving Livestock Grazing a Chance – A Success Story of Goats’ Role in Vegetation Management Project, Laguna Beach California USA

Livestock is not a problem but a solution. We should reconsider its role and realize its importance in ecosystem services. We should advocate the ecosystem service of the livestock and be aware the people about the role of livestock other than food production. Livestock grazing not only minimizes the risk of fire hazards but also enriches soil fertility and revitalizes ecosystems. For further reading, click on the link below.

Giving Livestock Grazing a Chance – A Success Story of Goats’ Role in Vegetation Management Project, Laguna Beach California USA

Give the Livestock its Original Role- The Grazing and Recover the Losses

Livestock is not a consumer only but a convertor, converting flora biosphere in the rich farmyard manure and returning the nutrients and undigestible fiber back to the soil. The manure helps in the improvement of soil texture, water retention ability, and microbiome richness to enhance fertility and improve moisture retention in the soil. Also, livestock manure provides a very rich culture to the soil microbiome, which indirectly helps in decomposing the plants’ residues. For further details, please go to the link; Give the Livestock its Original Role- The Grazing and Recover the Losses

Materializing camel manure for soil fertility and enrichment

A dairy camel weighing 600 kg produces 15-17 kg of dry manure daily. The racing and other camels produce half of that quantity. In 1000 camels’ dairy, per day manure production is about 16,000 kg. All these assets are going to waste. For further details, click on the below link.

Camel manure decomposes faster than many others because of the diverse and stronger microflora in camels’ rumen. Camel is, therefore, more efficient in nutrient recycling, making camels’ dung more useful for cropping and farming.

Contrary to grazing and soil-friendly animal agriculture, factory farming leads to soil erosion

Small-scale subsistence farming is the key to keeping our soil healthy and fertile. On the other hand, factory farming is resulting in soil erosion and narrowing the genetic resources (biodiversity). The erosion of soil has largely occurred due to the loss of structure by continual disturbance for crop planting and harvesting. If soil is repeatedly turned over, it is exposed to oxygen and its carbon is released into the atmosphere, causing it to fail to bind as effectively. This loss of integrity impacts the soil’s ability to store water, which neutralizes its role as a buffer to floods and a fruitful base for plants. Here is the link for further reading. Factory Farming Leads to Soil Erosion

 

 

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