Camel Manure Decomposition Project


Camel manure decomposes faster than many others because of the diverse and stronger microflora in camels’ rumen. Camel is, therefore, more efficient in nutrient recycling, making camels’ dung more useful for cropping and farming.

Preparing solution for different treatments
Mixing and stirring the manure

Just a Simple Calculation and the Treasure of Organic Farming Agent

A dairy camel weighing 600 kg produces 15-17 kg dry manure daily. The racing and other camels produce half of that quantity. In a 1000 camels’ dairy, per day manure production is about 16,000 kg. All this asset is going to waste.

On the other hand, date palm waste is also going to waste. There is no use at all. The camel dung (with a high and diversified level of microflora) can be a potential decomposing agent for date palm waste. Both wastes in combination can be a potential asset for organic farming in the region.”

Preparing solution with molasses
Mixing solution to the manure
Pouring solution at the manure

The Possible Uses of the Camel Manure

  1. Farm Yard Manure/fertilizer
  2. Material to combat desertification and dune fixing
  3. Bio-paper
  4. Bio-gas
  5. Power generation
Microbial solution
2 weaks conserved fresh manure
The treated compost airtight in bucket

Acknowledgment

I’m very much thankful to my team (workers of the farm Mr. Ghualm Din and Luqman) and Shah Hussain (horticulturist), working with ADAFSA here in Abudhabi.

Team of the project

We have some hopes that there will be a valuable level of decomposition of the manure if simply filled in the plastic bags. This way we will have better use of the empty bags and decomposition of the manure.

Untreated manure, observing the power of nature without treatment

WorthWhile Farm Agent

Camel manure is a worthwhile farm agent and is one of the precious resources to be returned back to the soil. Unfortunately, this precious source is going to waste as the farmers avoid them to use for land as it is in the form of hard balls and decompose very slowly when outside in nature. The decomposition of the camel manure in a feasible way can bring a revolution in soil fertility and crop production as it is very rich with a very wide diversity of the microbiome. It can enrich the soil with microorganisms and increase fertility of the soil.

I have been working and documenting about the camel manure as we have thousands of tons of camel manure which is going to waste each year. Before, I dumped fresh manure enveloped in polythene sheets under the sand. There was good compost but still, we need further trials to check the performance of different treatments on decommissioning of the manure. The details of the project will be shared in another article. To know more in detail, please go to the following links. https://arkbiodiv.com/2016/02/02/camels-dungzfrom-waste-to-a-worthwhile-farming-agent/amp/

Here is another article about the compost dumped in the desert. https://arkbiodiv.com/2019/01/10/camel-manure-compost-trial-in-alain-uae/amp/

Many scientists, farmers, and activists took a very deep interest in the idea of transforming camel manure into a worthwhile farm agent. Here, I compiled the response of different people from different parts of the world. https://arkbiodiv.com/2017/02/05/camel-manuresome-feedback-from-the-different-quarters-of-the-world/amp/

Conclusion

We must return the nutrients back to the soil. A compost rich with diverse microbes will be great support back to Mother Earth for its health and fertility. It is our responsibility to enrich the soil again and fertilize the arable cover of the land. Please help me with your feedback and technical support.

Categories: The Camel Manure

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