Sandy or Deserted, Richland vs Poorland

The Nature is True Friend

The land cover with the sands is sandy, commonly known as desert. But all the sandy soil are not deserted soil. To me, deserted mean the land abused by the factory farming or monocultural farming, full of the residues of the pesticides, weedicides and chemicals.

The monoculture farming is hazardous to the flora and fauna and kill the mother earth natural health.

The sandy soils are commonly known as deserts because of the poor/low annual precipitation. When there is enough precipitation, such sandy lands turn into lush green meadows. Such lands are the reservoirs of the plants and animal genetic resources. The plants of the deserts are very beautiful with attractive flowers. https://camel4all.blog/2019/12/09/beautiful-flowers-and-fruits-of-wild-flora-of-united-arab-emirates/

In thins blog, I have to share some very beautiful pictures which I took yesterday in the evening time. We received some few rains last 3 weeks and now the desert is very beautiful and full of beautiful shrubs and flowers.

The sandy deserts are blessed with very special plants which conserve moisture in their cushions, hairy to divert evaporation moisture and hardy to resist strong sunshine.

We just need to place some inputs like reseeding of native plants, protection from grazing for a certain period and some landscape adjustment, we can turn the sandy desert into a shrubland.

Author: Dr Raziq

I’m PhD in Animal Agriculture, currently working as a Technical Manager at Al Ain Farms for Livestock Production, Camel dairying, Alain, UAE. I had performed as a Professor and Dean, at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan (LUAWMS). I work on and write for the subjects of ‘turning camel from a beast of burden to a sustainable farm animal’, agricultural research policies, extensive livestock production systems, food security under climate change context, and sustainable use of traditional genetic resources for food and agriculture. Iim advocating camel under the theme of CAMEL4LIFE and believe in camel potential. I’m the founder and head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES), and Founder of the Camel Association of Pakistan. I also work as a freelance scientist working (currently member of steering committee) for Desert Net International (DNI). I’m an ethnoecologist, ethnobotanist, Ethnovet and ethomedicie researcher and reviewer. I explore deserts and grazing lands for knowledge and understanding.

7 thoughts on “Sandy or Deserted, Richland vs Poorland”

  1. What beautiful pictures! Please, do read my post that will be published this Saturday, at midnight our time. I write about the same phenomenon of desert blooming after a tiny bit of rain in Namibian Desert. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It will be published this Saturday, 14 December. I promised to write with collaboration with you an article about came’s incredibly nutritious milk, the plants the camels like and feed on and your important work in this field.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Apology, I don’t do anything but write, no social platform. But thanks. It is so inspiring to find people like yourself – distant part of the world, and yet we could have been related as we have so much in common. Thank you again.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Just to say that I just have found your message on my greenenature email address. I use this as I don’t wish to mix the blog contacts with my private email. Of course, you can still write to me the same way as you do now.
    Joanna

    Liked by 1 person

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