Camel is Turning from a Beast of Burden to a Modern Farm Animal


The peoples’ intelligence really works. Time is the best teacher.

Natural Health with the Camel Milk

Camel is the composite of all domestic animals with respect to its characteristics. Camel produces milk like the cow, fats like sheep, hair like the goat, riding like the horse, thick milk (Bactrian camel) like yak, work like the donkey, and hardy like mule etc. Every product of camel is useful, even urine and feces are valuable for medicinal use and paper production respectively. The long bones of camel are used by jewelers in some Arab and African countries. The camel rearing communities have very firm links with camel culture and camel production is not only a farming activity but part of heritage and culture.Detailed Nutritional Composition of Bactrian Camel’s Milkcropped-raziq.jpg

Camel was originally domesticated for its milk production in harsh and hostile ecosystems of the dry barren lands of Arabia. Later on, the trait of walking ability was the major selection criteria to use this precious animal in…

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Author: Dr Raziq

I’m PhD in Animal Agriculture, currently working as a Technical Manager at Al Ain Farms for Livestock Production, Camel dairying, Alain, UAE. I had performed as a Professor and Dean, at the Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan (LUAWMS). I work on and write for the subjects of ‘turning camel from a beast of burden to a sustainable farm animal’, agricultural research policies, extensive livestock production systems, food security under climate change context, and sustainable use of traditional genetic resources for food and agriculture. Iim advocating camel under the theme of CAMEL4LIFE and believe in camel potential. I’m the founder and head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES), and Founder of the Camel Association of Pakistan. I also work as a freelance scientist working (currently member of steering committee) for Desert Net International (DNI). I’m an ethnoecologist, ethnobotanist, Ethnovet and ethomedicie researcher and reviewer. I explore deserts and grazing lands for knowledge and understanding.

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